Mandela Day Thoughts

A lot of South Africans still have hope for our country. Unfortunately most people are looking for a messiah. Haibo, we need a wake up call. There is no Azor Ahai to save us and lead us through the long night(GoT reference). We need to realise that the power for real change lies in our hands and not the government’s. Placing a new president is not going to bring about the change we need. No policy is going to change our attitudes. We, the people, have to take matters into our own hands. I have said this time and time again, voting once every couple of years does not make you an active citizen. I mean, don’t get me wrong, voter turnout is crucial for the running of a successful democracy but it is not the only thing we can do to bring about change.

What is an active citizen? Someone with a positive attitude, hope and the willingness to change their way of thinking first before taking it to the streets. I would say that everything begins at home and in our small communities. We need to start having real conversations with our kids, siblings, parents, grandparents, cousins, etc. Facebook should not be the be all and end all of your activism when you can’t even talk to your siblings about patriarchy. We need to somehow get out of this Rainbow Nation hangover we are currently in. It’s not enough to call ourselves a Rainbow Nation if we are only willing to tolerate the other colours on a superficial basis.

We need to talk with purpose and listen with understanding. We need to be able to empathise with other people’s feelings. We need to understand why the past is so important and why people keep referring back to colonialism and apartheid as the root of our current problems.

Black people feel cheated in this democracy– and it should be evident why this is the case. Since apartheid ended, how did black people’s lives change? Is the vote enough to call yourself free? I think not. Black people still live in terrible conditions. Townships can be likened to concentration camps, minus the gas chambers.

Yes, we can blame the ANC for the conditions getting worse instead of improving but prior to 1994, conditions weren’t ideal either. So we ought to examine the inception of all these current problems we face. Black people don’t own their ancestral lands. We can blame the government for why the land was never redistributed but as to the start of the issue ie land dispossession, we can look to the Glen Gray Act (1894), Natives Land Act (1913)Population Registration Act (1950), Group Areas Act (1950), and the Natives Resettlement Act (1954).

It is important to understand why black people are, in general, in a worse off position than…let’s say white people. Why? Why should we keep bringing up the past? The answer is simple really…

If we do not consider the context then imagine how this might appear to children? The world around us confirms white supremacy. People with decent jobs, big houses and cars are white. The people who clean up after the rich are black. To a child or someone else who does not know the history, white people simply work harder than the rest. Black people simply belong in those positions or they are too lazy to study and work to get themselves out of their situations. We hopefully know this is not the truth and that black people have been (historically and continue to be) prevented from doing better.

White people in South African live in fear. They used to live very safe and comfortable lives in a police state that protected them politically, economically and socially. Now things are starting to change. (Some) white people feel that black people are targeting them. This is not a completely unreasonable thought because usually when you wrong someone they seek revenge. Fortunately most black people are oblivious to this so called white genocide (because it’s not a thing). White people also feel threatened in the work place because of affirmative action and quotas– even though statistics still show that white people earn more than black people on average and also unemployment rates for white people are super low.

We can’t dismiss people’s anger or people’s fears. All we can do is try to get to the root of it all so we can attempt to understand it and be able to empathise with people, no matter how irrational their fears are. Being a better citizen starts with being better to those around you. Your colleagues, employees, employers, etc. Take 67 minutes to chat to them, ask them questions. Ask them about their hopes and dreams. Ask them about their fears and concerns. I think you will find that most of us just want to be able to provide for our families and live in a better country.

#Zwe

Intersectionality

Black men: White people have oppressed black people for long enough. This needs to end now! We are willing to die for our freedom.

Black womxn: Agreed, but we also want to simultaneously tackle issues that womxn face such as gender inequality, sexism, patriarchy, misogyny, rape culture…

Black men: Shhh my sister, daughter of the soil! Don’t derail this movement. Don’t let white people influence you with these modern things that go against our culture. Let’s focus on the real enemy, which is whiteness.

Black womxn: 😩🙄

White womxn: Come over here! Together let’s fight against gender based violence. Patriarchy must fall! Come on girls!

Black womxn: Yes, finally! Let’s also keep in mind that there are many issues that we face not only as womxn but as black people too. Like systemic racism, police brutality and the war on “drugs” which is actually the new Jim Crow.

White womxn: **silence for 5 minutes**

Let’s talk about cutting tampon tax! Whooo! Let’s rally girls!

Black Trans womxn: Can we talk about the struggles trans womxn face? Can we talk about the on going killings, rapes and ostracism that we face and other queer folks?

(Black/white) Cishet womxn: But you don’t face all the struggles real womxn face, you might have penis privilege.

Black Trans womxn: 😱😭😡

****

The importance of intersectionality 💯

#ZumaMustFall / #PeoplesMarch / #AntiZumaMarch playlist

 

1. Kumbaya
2. I said a boom-a-chicka-boom
3. G-R-O-another O-V-Y give me a Groovy
4. The more we are together, together, together (cause your friends are my friends)
5. Our team’s dynamite (don’t mess with dynamite)
6. In-Khosi Sick-a-lay-lah i-Afrika (die Stem)
7. The wheels on the bus
8. We’ve got the power (yes we do, we’ve got the power how about you?)
9. We will rock you!
10. If you’re happy and you know it (clap your hands)

#Junk

If you never spoke in defense of the poor before the #junkstatus, please spare us now.

Don’t act like the landless Azanians, who are being deprived of their dignity on the daily, are your key concern. If that was the case you would have put your money and mouth behind the future of the country instead of vilifying them.

You’re only speaking out now because you’re starting to feel the effects of an economy you thought was yours to control.

 

**side note**

I do not support what is going on. I do not think #junkstatus is good for anyone. I just think that it is ridiculous to ignore people’s real motivations behind their newly found protests passion.

 

I think it’s easier to allow injustice to continue because we don’t see each other as human beings. We strip ourselves of the very fundamental teachings of Ubuntu. Umuntu ungumuntu ngabantu. If you don’t see other human beings how can you truly be human? It is only through others that we find our humanity.

People are suffering and we rationalise why it is that they have to endure this and it’s bullshit. We use religion to rationalise this suffering. We use work ethic to justify poverty.
We allow people to go to bed hungry even though we always throw out food. We allow people to be deprived of their human rights because we think there’s nothing we can do, “they should have worked harder.” We allow womxn to be raped because “they should not have worn such a short skirt.”

We use all these excuses to justify why the world is the way it is and at some point we need to stop.

When will we realise that the world is the way it is because we allow it to be so. We are the society we always complain about. We are all complicit.

“It’s not about race! It’s about neatness.”

When you tell a black child that the state of their natural hair is not neat what else are you saying about blackness? Are you saying that to be black and neat does not go hand in hand? Are you saying that unless you chemically straighten your hair to match what caucasians achieve naturally, then you can never be neat? Are you saying that blackness is against the school’s code of conduct? Are you saying that a code of conduct can be above the Constitution?

Have you lost your mind?

#ElectionResults

How do I feel about the election results? I’m optimistic.

Why?
Because this means the next 2-3 years are going to be lit. We’re going to see service delivery like never before. Both the ANC and DA will do the damn thing. They will be slaying their municipalities and doing it for the gods. We will all be yelling “yaaaas queen”.

This is because the ANC finally has a reason to have uvalo. The DA can officially call itself an opposition-nyana party. The EFF needs to continue exposing the lies, putting pressure and causing terror in parliament. The IFP must also giya and gida in Nkandla just because.

Thank you to everyone who went to vote. You also did the damn thing. No one can rest on their laurels because I think it’s clear that dabbing and selling us dreams is not enough.

The Rand is also on the up and up so that’s cool. Kumnand’ emasabhabsini aseMzansi. I hope the poor can only reap the benefits of all of this.